Needs More Research

irréfléchi, léger, superficiel

9 notes &

My trip to Paris: Saturday Part One

vapaus-ystavyys-tasaarvo:

Bonjour Mesdames, Messieurs et Mesautres (?)!

I AM BACK FROM PARIS. WITH PICTURES. (I’M KIND OF HYPER RIGHT NOW. SORRY.)

Okay, so we (we = my dad and me) went there on Friday (17 Oct. 2014) and came back today on Monday (though it might not be Monday anymore when I post this, never mind). So three nights, two full days. I’ll write more on my other blog but this is a Les Mis blog so let’s focus on the Les Mis stuff.

Warning: The pictures are of questionable quality. Sorry. I’m not a photographer and my only cameras were the one on my phone and the one on my tablet.

Also this is pretty picture heavy. And long.


So, Saturday. It was a long day so I split this thing up.

Our first instalment shall be:

  • The barricade on Rue de la Chanv(er)rerie

(It was supposed to be more than this but the post got long!)

Bonus: Rue des Prêcheurs and Rue Saint-Denis.

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(via pilferingapples)

36 notes &

valinaraii:

Lorenzo Goñi: Gatos vigilantes o los gatos de la Puerta del Sol. 1975.
The tower clock in the background belongs to the old Post Office, which in present times houses the regional government of Madrid (not the City Council). Last year I made a little post about the tradition of the Twelve Grapes which is so linked to this particular building and my lifetime issues with it. But now the cats reminds me the nickname often given to the people of Madrid: gatos. Yeah, literally cats. But why? After all the iconic animal which figures in the coat of arms is a bear (and there was also a dragon during the 19th Century and the first part of the 20th).
There are several theories, the most known dating from the time of the Reconquista, when Madrid was taken by Alfonso VI with a little help of a young guy who knew well the city walls and whose climbing skills had earned him the sobriquet of Gato. Our hero established himself in the city and not only his descendants but also all those who were born in Madrid inherited the nickname. 
For the image.

valinaraii:

Lorenzo Goñi: Gatos vigilantes o los gatos de la Puerta del Sol. 1975.

The tower clock in the background belongs to the old Post Office, which in present times houses the regional government of Madrid (not the City Council). Last year I made a little post about the tradition of the Twelve Grapes which is so linked to this particular building and my lifetime issues with it. But now the cats reminds me the nickname often given to the people of Madrid: gatos. Yeah, literally cats. But why? After all the iconic animal which figures in the coat of arms is a bear (and there was also a dragon during the 19th Century and the first part of the 20th).

There are several theories, the most known dating from the time of the Reconquista, when Madrid was taken by Alfonso VI with a little help of a young guy who knew well the city walls and whose climbing skills had earned him the sobriquet of Gato. Our hero established himself in the city and not only his descendants but also all those who were born in Madrid inherited the nickname. 

For the image.

29 notes &

camwyn:

deepseanews:

Photo courtesy of Casey Dunn. Available by CC on Flckr This species bring a whole new meaning to butt face. It’s Latin name even means butt face.  I jest… it actually means resembling a pig’s rump. Chaetopterus pugaporcinus is a polychaete and like other worms it has segments.  Some of the segmen…
http://deepseanews.com/2014/10/these-are-a-few-of-my-favorite-species-pig-butt-worm/

Someone get itswalky on the horn. BUTTS.

camwyn:

deepseanews:

Photo courtesy of Casey Dunn. Available by CC on Flckr This species bring a whole new meaning to butt face. It’s Latin name even means butt face.  I jest… it actually means resembling a pig’s rump. Chaetopterus pugaporcinus is a polychaete and like other worms it has segments.  Some of the segmen…

http://deepseanews.com/2014/10/these-are-a-few-of-my-favorite-species-pig-butt-worm/

Someone get itswalky on the horn. BUTTS.

Filed under important development in the world of butts

30 notes &

histoireinsolite:

awesomearchives:

The thing that gets me the most about the archives job market is that there’s a need for people to do the work, there just isn’t money to pay them.

So true of many museum-related fields… I’ve been a curator/collections manager/education assistant coordinator/etc for a house museum in New York since July and there is not a cent to pay me, but they need at least 3 of me to do all that’s needed! 

Oh god, and it’s true at all levels.  (My husband’s workplace is now open six days a week, up from five, while the number of employees has dropped something like a third? more? since he started working there.)

Filed under have you hugged an archivist today? BECAUSE THEY COULD REALLY USE IT

22 notes &

northeastnature:

Ok, I’m cheating here. This is a yellow-bellied sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius), a northeastern woodpecker known for drilling rows of holes in tree trunks to drink sap. But in this picture, it’s drilling into a… palm tree. Like many other species, sapsuckers split their time between their northern breeding grounds and warmer - sometimes tropical - wintering grounds. I saw this one in the Bahamas, and it was a helpful reminder that tons of “northeastern” birds are really cross-continental birds.

northeastnature:

Ok, I’m cheating here. This is a yellow-bellied sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius), a northeastern woodpecker known for drilling rows of holes in tree trunks to drink sap. But in this picture, it’s drilling into a… palm tree. Like many other species, sapsuckers split their time between their northern breeding grounds and warmer - sometimes tropical - wintering grounds. I saw this one in the Bahamas, and it was a helpful reminder that tons of “northeastern” birds are really cross-continental birds.