Needs More Research

irréfléchi, léger, superficiel

29 notes &

sathinfection asked: goatjolras looking disdainfully at grantaire

pilferingapples:

clenster:

such a serious face

"Enjolras  disdains me. "

"He’s a goat, Grantaire, that’s just how he looks. "

"…It looks like disdain."

"Yeah, that’s true."

(I forever love Goat!jolras’ golden horns.)

15 notes &

Anonymous asked: Oh, no, don't see that (the salut/safety thing) as a critique to your blog, it wasn't! I know people who speak English use "Committee of Public Safety" and I'm not criticizing you or people who use it (well, when I talk about it, I use this translation too), I just noticed it in French and wanted to share with someone because I pay way too much attention to translation and linguistics stuff, so I was kinda "why did they use this word and not that one?". Sorry for the misunderstanding.

tweetonslacarmagnole:

bunniesandbeheadings:

Oh! Er, did my tone come off as hostile? ‘Cuz I might’ve misunderstood you but I wasn’t offended. I’m pretty hard to upset, actually! Sorry for any misconception.

Anyways, I’m sure there’s some complicated answer to this to be dug from the annals of French Revolution historiography, probably something about religious connotations or totalitarianism or maybe one guy made a translation error that was just copied through the ages.

Unfortunately I dunno why this is but I’ve observed it too and it has bugged me too. But hey, at least we are bugged together and not alone.

If any of my followers knows the reason for this common translation, please feel free to hop on board and let us know!

Seems likely to me that this translation caught on because there were “Committees of Safety” in the English Civil War and the American Revolution. Anglophone historiography was primed for that term in a revolutionary context.

18 notes &

northeastnature:

Here’s a large, bizarre giant swallowtail caterpillar (Papilio cresphontes). This species was once highly rare in the northeast, but is now a regular fixture due to climate change. I found my first one yesterday! I’d heard that these caterpillars mimic bird poop to avoid being eaten, but their true pattern is complex and gorgeous. Plus, if startled, they splorp out a pair of red “horns” called osmeteria. The last picture shows the mature butterfly in all its glory.

Filed under splorp a highly accurate term no joke

5 notes &

Unflattering nighttime pic of my new baby Stapelia asterias for pilferingapples. Some day, if I can make it happy, it may be a big strong carrion-flower!  (Right now it’s propped up against a feather, since it wants to lean to one side.  Silly plant babby.)

Unflattering nighttime pic of my new baby Stapelia asterias for pilferingapples. Some day, if I can make it happy, it may be a big strong carrion-flower!  (Right now it’s propped up against a feather, since it wants to lean to one side.  Silly plant babby.)

Filed under succulents stapelia

4,033 notes &

griseus:

The marine eels and other members of the superorder  Elopomorpha have a leptocephalus larval stage, which are flat and transparent. This group is quite diverse, containing 801 species in 24 orders, 24 families and 156 genera (super diverse). 

Leptocephali have compressed bodies that contain jelly-like substances on the inside, with a thin layer of muscle with visible myomeres on the outside, a simple tube as a gut, dorsal and anal fins, but they lack pelvic fins. They also don’t have any red blood cells (most likely is respiration by passive diffusion), which they only begin produce when the change into the juvenile glass eel stage. Appears to feed on marine snow, tiny free-floating particles in the ocean.

This large size leptocephalus must be a species of Muraenidae (moray eels), and probably the larva of a long thin ribbon eel, which is metamorphosing, and is entering shallow water to finish metamorphosis into a young eel, in Bali, Indonesia.

(via camwyn)

Filed under come on nature now you're just making this up

93 notes &

The Gothic Novel 1790 – 1830: Index to Motifs

oulfis:

Hey, lookit that! I published another thing!!

funeral: attended accidentally, 57, 100, 119, 130; clandestine, 186; gorgeous, 114; sham, 3, 6, 65, 70, 75, 92, 99, 138, 191.

ghost: with baby, 29; dancing or singing, 107, 206; fiery, 33, 76, 79, 80; in flaming boat, 34; hairy, 9, 187; helpful, 24, 26, 29, 30, 31, 56, 67, 75, 82, 90, 102, 130, 158, 187, 188, 194, 200; lower-class, 101; murderous, 207; nonhuman, 43, 75, 79, 83, 128; of victim, appearing to murderer, 1, 7, 9, 10, 29, 33, 55, 56, 70, 76, 82, 99, 108, 135, 139, 178, 188, 194, 199, 201, 202.

guest: perfidious, 35, 38, 86, 127; uninvited and sinister, 10, 42, 75, 187.

(via pilgrim--soul)

Filed under excellent guest colon perfidious

27 notes &

cactguy:

Ferocactus emoryi ssp. rectispinus / Straight-spined barrel cactusDesert Botanical Garden, Phoenix
Ferocactus emoryi ssp. rectispinus is native to central Baja California, Mexico, being found near the coast in Bahía de la Concepción and inland in the Cerro Colorado.
The plants are viciously guarded by ants that feed on the nectar which allows only flighted pollinators the opportunity to access the plants ensuring greater genetic diversity.
 

cactguy:

Ferocactus emoryi ssp. rectispinus / Straight-spined barrel cactus
Desert Botanical Garden, Phoenix

Ferocactus emoryi ssp. rectispinus is native to central Baja California, Mexico, being found near the coast in Bahía de la Concepción and inland in the Cerro Colorado.

The plants are viciously guarded by ants that feed on the nectar which allows only flighted pollinators the opportunity to access the plants ensuring greater genetic diversity.

 

Filed under nature being cool